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AARON ROSE: PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A BEAUTIFUL LOSER

Aaron Rose sits down with Gestalten.tv for an interview encompassing his many views on art, anarchy, and the art world as a whole, discussing some of the more diverse opinions that have defined his shotgun effect on the world of creativity. Having worked in street art, curation, film, photography, writing, music, and many other fields, Rose is addicted to creation. The artist is also addicted to talking art with friends and strangers, as anyone who has run into him at openings and art receptions around the city and the world can tell you.

One of the more inspiring artists to come out of the street art movement, the man who introduced Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, and Harmony Korine is a blast to hear every time he speaks on his passions. 

Aaron Rose is one of my favorite people in the art world. 

(Source: vimeo.com)

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SHEPARD FAIREY ON KEITH HARING FOR OBEY FALL 2012 LINE

In a Summer season that has seen much tolerance awareness in the world of street fashion, Shepard Fairey’s OBEY Clothing has teamed up with the Keith Haring Foundation to create a line of clothing that celebrates the artist’s work. While by no means about the artist’s lifestyle, Haring’s foundation exists for the purpose of spreading AIDS awareness, a disease that plagued the artist until his untimely death, wrongfully affecting the way his career was viewed by many of his contemporaries.

Shepard Fairey has long been one to recognize the contributing factors of his forefathers in art, and to hear him speak of Haring in the above video is to hear a gracious fan speak on the work that inspires him. The full length version of this video for the Fall 2012 line will be released soon on the OBEY website.

(Source: urbanartvideos.com)

NEW BLOOD AT THINKSPACE GALLERY RECAP

"New Blood" wrapped at Thinkspace Gallery in Culver City this last weekend, and featured work by some of contemporary and pop art’s biggest names. The concept of the show was a metaphorical torch-passing from the likes of Ron English, Shepard Fairey, and Jonathan Yeo to their apprentices or otherwise promising new artists. 

Art collector and great-idea-haver Morgan Spurlock curated the show, in his first curation and best idea since “Super Size Me.” Spurlock conceptualized the idea after becoming friends with Ron English, and pitched the idea to Thinkspace owner Andrew Hosner. The rest was history, as is the show now. But you can catch some of the work in this video made by street art documentarian BIRDMAN.

(Source: 12ozprophet.com)

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SHEPARD FAIREY “HARMONY AND DISCORD” VIDEO

Shepard Fairey gives us a rare glimpse into his process with this studio visit video at Pace Paper studio in New York and the Watanabe Press in Brooklyn while preparing for his upcoming exhibition at Pace Prints.

Eight minutes of interview time gives viewers insight to the concepts behind some of Shep’s more visually striking work, showing the depth the artist is capable of capturing with such a flat work as print. The process also rings true to this ideal with varying levels of depth introduced to the flat surface of the works by means of various materials being introduced to the printing process.Shep’s “Harmony & Discord” opened on May 5 and is on view at Pace Prints in New York until June 16th; find more details below.

Shepard Fairey: Harmony & Discord
Pace Prints
521 W 26th St
New York, NY 10001

Show runs: May 5th-June 16th, 2012 

(Source: hypebeast.com)

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OBEY THE GIANT - NARRATIVE FILM ABOUT SHEPARD FAIREY - KICKSTARTER PROJECT

Being the first narrative film ever to tell the story of any period of Shep’s life, filmmaker and Julian Marshall of Rhode Island School of Design in Washington, D.C. has created a 25-minute short film of cinema quality outlining a powerful transition in the street artist’s journey to stardom. OBEY THE GIANT is a film that covers the story of the first large bilboard that Fairey appropriated into a community-stirring news story, and took eight days to film as part of Marshall’s thesis project.

A street art piece of its own, the film caused a splash when a guerilla film-making technique involving hijacking a part of campus gave the neighborhood a jolt when they astoundingly assumed former Mayor Buddy Cianci was running again. Check out the Kickstarter project for your chance at an original Shepard Fairey piece above and a synopsis of the film below, and click here to see the full campaign.

Based on the true story of Shepard Fairey’s first act of street art, OBEY THE GIANT tells the story of a young skate punk challenging a big-city mayor and the powers-that-be at art school. Frustrated by his inability to gain respect within the confines of art school Shepard sets out to gain notoriety and acclaim by targeting the most powerful man in Providence, former Mayor Buddy Cianci. Risking expulsion and jail time Shepard plasters Andre the Giant’s face over the image of Cianci on a campaign billboard. As word of Shepard’s prank gets out, Shepard learns that art is a weapon and attention is both a blessing and a curse.

CS EDITIONS NOTEBOOKS BY SHEPARD FAIREY AND PARRA

A pocket notebook is an artist’s most deadly weapon, even when it’s not passing cancer into your pelvis. Los Angeles-based CS Editions Notebooks understands the gravity of such a tool, and has sought out some of the world’s most famous artists to design covers to inspire artists to keep up the hard work. The “Lotus Diamond” cover by Shepard Fairey lays out the artist’s signature style, while the Dutch artist Parra is featured on a cover titled “The Vengeance Machine” with the artist’s trademark characters in basic blocks of color. 

You can pick up your notebook soon and support Shep in his time of turmoil, or Parra in my HOLLA HOLLAND! campaign by checking out the CS Editions online store.

(Source: hypebeast.com)

SHEPARD FAIREY COULD DO JAIL TIME
When not employing backhanded tactics while fighting ne’erdowells on an episode of The Simpsons alongside Ron English and other street artists, Shepard Fairey is employing similarly backhanded tactics in a fight against anti-creative copyright laws. After settling out of court in what seemed like a victory for the OBEY camp against the Associated Press, recent news circuits swirled into a frenzy when it was discovered that Shep had created false documents and deleted files to lie in court. He is now being charged with contempt in the federal courts following the case that saw him lying about using the AP’s photo for his Obama “HOPE” poster, and stating instead that it was another of their photos used with artistic liberties taken to a degree that was permissible under the “Fair Use Act.”
Shep may face some jail time, as a report released by the Associated Press states that the government intends on seeking a term of imprisonment for the artist, who plead guilty and is currently out on recognizance until sentencing

SHEPARD FAIREY COULD DO JAIL TIME

When not employing backhanded tactics while fighting ne’erdowells on an episode of The Simpsons alongside Ron English and other street artists, Shepard Fairey is employing similarly backhanded tactics in a fight against anti-creative copyright laws. After settling out of court in what seemed like a victory for the OBEY camp against the Associated Press, recent news circuits swirled into a frenzy when it was discovered that Shep had created false documents and deleted files to lie in court. He is now being charged with contempt in the federal courts following the case that saw him lying about using the AP’s photo for his Obama “HOPE” poster, and stating instead that it was another of their photos used with artistic liberties taken to a degree that was permissible under the “Fair Use Act.”

Shep may face some jail time, as a report released by the Associated Press states that the government intends on seeking a term of imprisonment for the artist, who plead guilty and is currently out on recognizance until sentencing

OUTSIDE IN: THE STORY OF ART IN THE STREETS

Like it or not, “Art in the Streets” was one of the most important things to happen to the art world in the last few years, and one of the biggest things ever to happen to graffiti and street art. Director Alex Stapleton takes us inside the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles’ famous exhibition. 

From Shepard Fairey to Lee Quiñones, Swoon, Futura, and Mister Cartoon; from Revok to Martha Cooper, Invader and more, the show that took place from April 17-August 8, 2011, followed graffiti and street art as far back as Basquiat and even some of the gang graffiti in the 1940s and 50s in LA. Graffiti and street art are mainstays of the high art world now, and this documentary aims to show how MOCA contributed to that fact.

For the record, I thought the show was tastefully done with what highly controversial subject matter they had to work with.

(Source: vimeo.com)

CURTIS KULIG X OBEY “LOVE ME” SIGNATURE LINE

When I was first introduced to Curtis Kulig by sight of his “Love Me” tags in Hollywood, I didn’t know it was a thing. The street art movement was taking off and I thought some hipster had grabbed a paint pen and wrote what he was thinking at the moment on the wall outside my office at deviantART. I did notice, however, that someone had taken extra care to give the lettering some character, and that impressed me.

Years later, and not only has the artist gone all-city, but he’s begun to take over the world alongside friends like Shepard Fairey. He is now collaborating with OBEY for the first time, for their 2012 Spring/Summer catalog with limited-edition apparel for men and women. Check out the full collection here, which keeps both styles intact with OBEY’s signature Andre the Giant graphic and an all-over Love Me tag print. 

INTERVIEW: MR. BRAINWASH
Love him or hate him with every fiber of your being, Mr. Brainwash is a recognizable face in the world of art nowadays. The embodiment of the criticisms of street artists like Shepard Fairey and Banksy, MBW has been selling tons and tons of art for years in Los Angeles and across the world.
He has spent that entire time defending his existence in every interview. Having hung out with him multiple times myself, it is only by blind joy in his work that he could still be sane (or in his case, completely insane?). This is arguably his best interview to date, with some answers to tough questions that are more clutch than LeBron.
Check out the interview with The Talks here.

INTERVIEW: MR. BRAINWASH

Love him or hate him with every fiber of your being, Mr. Brainwash is a recognizable face in the world of art nowadays. The embodiment of the criticisms of street artists like Shepard Fairey and Banksy, MBW has been selling tons and tons of art for years in Los Angeles and across the world.

He has spent that entire time defending his existence in every interview. Having hung out with him multiple times myself, it is only by blind joy in his work that he could still be sane (or in his case, completely insane?). This is arguably his best interview to date, with some answers to tough questions that are more clutch than LeBron.

Check out the interview with The Talks here.